Do Wrong, Also Dehydration Risk Relating to Non-Communicable Diseases

SMKN 1 Slahung
A lack of fluid intake, dehydration alias konsisi effect on the body.In addition to distraction and make the body limp, dehydrated also associated with the risk of non-communicable diseases such as stroke, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus.
Disclosed Dr. Dr. Fiastuti Witjaksono SpGK, from the Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Indonesia, the effects of a person’s hydration status is twofold.First, if too much fluid intake to satisfy a sweet drink consumption, the effect of excess caloric intake was subsequently leading to obesity.
“If it’s obesity, could be subject to non-communicable diseases. Tp tenyata no other path if the dehdrasi, less liquid, can be directly related to non-communicable diseases, directly without going through obesity,” said Dr. FIAS met at the University of Indonesia, Salemba, Central Jakarta, Wednesday (11/16/2016).
Read also: Hydration Right, Recover Flu Fast
Dr. FIAS explained, in the body there Adrinin anti-diuretic hormone vasopressin (AVP).AVP functions to balance fluids in the body.Well, when someone is dehydrated, the high levels of AVP and fluid reabsorption he did more often.Dr. FIAS confirms, AVP high levels also have an effect on the occurrence of liver cells glycogenolysis.
“So glikogennya destroyed so glucose levels rise. This causes disturbances in hydration status causes a direct effect on noncommunicable disease,” added the doctor who practices at Cipto Mangunkusumo this.
He added that there is some research to see that when a person is dehydrated, her glucose levels to rise.Therefore, AVP also be directly worked in the liver cells and is glikogenelisis devastating glycogen so glucose levels rise.

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